Cycling - Knowledge

Check your Cycling Lingo Score: Are you Well-versed with the Cycling Language?

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I was riding with a bunch of friends and suddenly my riding partner asked me, “Will you quit half-wheeling?” and there I was, perplexed and clueless about what does that mean. Riding a bike is hard, but do you know what the hardest thing about riding a bike is? Talking about it, in other words, the “ Cycling Lingo or Language “.

The more you ride, the more you immerse yourself in the cycling lingo.

If you can differentiate between a sprocket and a Schrader and can pretty much tell which part is what, bingo!

Read on to find out how many of the listed terms you are familiar with in the Cycling Lingo Quiz .

Cycling Lingo: Let the Test Begin!

Aero

Well, for the ones who know it – well done!

For the ones who don’t – Aero is an abbreviation for aerodynamics . Used as a slang among the cyclists to describe gears like helmets, handlebars, and windshields.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

Anything that helps the cyclist to con his/her biggest opponent—the wind—is termed aero.

Bibs

The cycling bibs are the most important piece of the entire kit. Cyclists prefer bibs or suspenders (the overalls) instead of the elastic waistband as the former offers more ease around the waist.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

They are comfortable in the bend-over cycling position as one does not have to reach back and hike the shorts back up.

Bonk

Well, are you going bonk-ers!

In the cycling lingo dictionary, Bonk means hitting a wall and getting exhausted before you finish your ride.

That happens when you overlook your diet plans and completely ignore the importance of carb intake.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

With deficient carb levels, your body consumes whatever carb is available for energy release, leaving you weakened or spent-out for further rides.

Acute deficiency of carbs, which leads to glycogen deficiency, can be detrimental and may lead to low blood pressure. It is essential to know what to eat and when to eat!

Half-Wheel

Well, what are you thinking?

In cycling lingo, Half-wheel is a dangerous move that can turn friendly rides into fights.

When you are riding behind someone and your front wheel creeps up on their back wheel, then this dangerous situation is known as half-wheeling. So, drive safe and if you happen to be a beginner, please follow the 9 Cycling Guidelines for beginners.

Sprocket

Rocket? Nahhh….

It’s sprocket!

It is a profiled wheel with teeth and cogs upon which radical projections engage a chain passing over it.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

There are two types of sprockets in a bike: one in the rear and the other in the front, known as chainrings and cogs , respectively.

Also, if you are having small issues with your cycle like flat tyre, the skipping chains, then check out These simple tips to troubleshoot your cycle !

Schrader

Sounds like shredder!!

Well, for cycling lingo users, it is a valve found on the tyre of the bikes to inflate the tubes within.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

The pin in the center controls the airflow. It requires pressure on the inner pin to let the air in.

Criterium

A criterium is also known as a “crit.” It is a race consisting of several laps around a closed circuit normally 1 to 2 km in length.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

The exciting venue makes it a thrilling event as the spectators can watch the riders while they compete.

Frame

Frame, as per cycling lingo and language, is the bike’s backbone to which the bicycle’s parts are attached. It comes in different shapes and sizes.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

You should choose the frame which fits your requirements properly and enables efficient energy use, pedalling posture, and comfort.

Peloton

The word “peloton” is derived from French; it literally means “platoon.” It is a pack of riders in a road race, also called as a bunch.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

Riding in a group saves energy by riding close to or near other riders.

Riding in a peloton takes knowledge, fitness and the know-how of cycling.

Jersey

Jersey is a common item in any athlete’s kit. But in cycling these jerseys are different. They are often brightly colored to improve visibility during riding.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

They are made up of fabrics that keep the skin dry and make you feel comfortable while pedalling.

These zip-up jerseys are equipped with rear pockets for carrying energy food and other tools.

Cleat

Cleats are the parts that are attached to the sole of the shoes that enable more efficient pedalling. Older-style cleats have a slot that fits over the back of the pedal.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

New clip-less pedals have a specially designed cleat that locks into the pedal so it does not put stress on the knee.

Fred

Well, this is actually interesting!

Fred is a person who spends a lot of money on bike and clothes but still does not know how to ride a bike. The female “Fred” is known as “Doris.”

This term is used by cyclist enthusiasts to describe another cyclist who does not conform to the norms of serious road cycling.

Lead-out

Did you know?

Lead-out is a way to help the other rider to win in a final sprint by providing the windbreak and opening up a hole in the pack.

Cycling Lingo: Words That Only a Cyclist Can Understand

The rider intentionally sacrifices his/her chances of winning the race.

So how many words did you know?

If your scorecard shows cent percent results then you are well versed with the cycling lingo/language.

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